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Portraits of a Monarch Just Stopping By

A male monarch, Danaus plexippus, spreads its wings on a tower of jewels (Echium wildpretii) in Vacaville, Calif. on Sunday, May 23. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Welcome, Danaus plexippus!  A monarch butterfly, the first of the year, fluttered through our family pollinator garden in Vacaville, Calif. last Sunday and hung around for about two hours. We clocked him in at 5 p.m. and he exited...

A male monarch, Danaus plexippus, spreads its wings on a tower of jewels (Echium wildpretii) in Vacaville, Calif. on Sunday, May 23. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A male monarch, Danaus plexippus, spreads its wings on a tower of jewels (Echium wildpretii) in Vacaville, Calif. on Sunday, May 23. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male monarch, Danaus plexippus, spreads its wings on a tower of jewels (Echium wildpretii) in Vacaville, Calif. on Sunday, May 23. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The monarch lands on a mallow, Althaea officinalis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The monarch lands on a mallow, Althaea officinalis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The monarch lands on a mallow, Althaea officinalis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The monarch took a liking to a yellow rose,
The monarch took a liking to a yellow rose, "Sparkle and Shine," related to the Julia Child rose. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The monarch took a liking to a yellow rose, "Sparkle and Shine," related to the Julia Child rose. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The monarch touched down on a succulent, hens-and-chicks (when it blooms, it's known as a
The monarch touched down on a succulent, hens-and-chicks (when it blooms, it's known as a "rooster." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The monarch touched down on a succulent, hens-and-chicks (when it blooms, it's known as a "rooster." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The monarch stayed on the ear of a cat (garden sculpture)  for about five minutes. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The monarch stayed on the ear of a cat (garden sculpture) for about five minutes. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The monarch stayed on the ear of a cat (garden sculpture) for about five minutes. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, May 25, 2020 at 3:03 PM

Bohart Museum Virtual Open House: Honing in On the Hornets!

Wasp expert Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum of Entomology, UC Davis, shows an Asian giant hornet specimen during the virtual open house May 22.

Oh, the questions that Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum of Entomology, fielded at the Bohart's first-ever virtual symposium, held Friday morning, May 22. For nearly an hour (11 to 11:45), Kimsey answered questions about the Asian...

Wasp expert Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum of Entomology, UC Davis, shows an Asian giant hornet specimen during the virtual open house May 22.
Wasp expert Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum of Entomology, UC Davis, shows an Asian giant hornet specimen during the virtual open house May 22.

Wasp expert Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum of Entomology, UC Davis, shows an Asian giant hornet specimen during the virtual open house May 22.

Like to color? You can download this illustration on the Bohart Museum website. It's the work of undergraduate student Meghan Crebbins-Oats.
Like to color? You can download this illustration on the Bohart Museum website. It's the work of undergraduate student Meghan Crebbins-Oats.

Like to color? You can download this illustration on the Bohart Museum website. It's the work of undergraduate student Meghan Crebbins-Oats.

Many insects, including this Jerusalem cricket, are being mistaken for the Asian giant hornet. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Many insects, including this Jerusalem cricket, are being mistaken for the Asian giant hornet. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Many insects, including this Jerusalem cricket, are being mistaken for the Asian giant hornet. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, May 22, 2020 at 3:23 PM

Ready for the May 22th Bohart Museum Virtual Open House?

The Asian giant hornet, detected twice in North America last fall: a colony on Vancouver Island, British Columbia (destroyed) and a dead hornet in Blaine, Wash. (Photo courtesy of Washington State Department of Agriculture)

If Lynn Kimsey, who directs the Bohart Museum of Entomology, UC Davis, had her say, the Asian giant hornets would NOT be nicknamed “the murder hornets.”  Kimsey, professor of entomology with the UC Davis Department of...

The Asian giant hornet, detected twice in North America last fall: a colony on Vancouver Island, British Columbia (destroyed) and a dead hornet in Blaine, Wash. (Photo courtesy of Washington State Department of Agriculture)
The Asian giant hornet, detected twice in North America last fall: a colony on Vancouver Island, British Columbia (destroyed) and a dead hornet in Blaine, Wash. (Photo courtesy of Washington State Department of Agriculture)

The Asian giant hornet, detected twice in North America last fall: a colony on Vancouver Island, British Columbia (destroyed) and a dead hornet in Blaine, Wash. (Photo courtesy of Washington State Department of Agriculture)

Some of the butterfly specimens at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. The museums houses a global collection of nearly 8 million insects. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Some of the butterfly specimens at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. The museums houses a global collection of nearly 8 million insects. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Some of the butterfly specimens at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. The museums houses a global collection of nearly 8 million insects. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, May 21, 2020 at 4:20 PM

Bee Inspired: It's World Bee Day!

A honey bee dusted with pollen from Gaillardia, also known as

Did you observe World Bee Day today? Every year on May 20, the United Nations asks us to think about this day, "to raise awareness of the importance of pollinators" and "the threats they face and their contribution to sustainable...

A honey bee dusted with pollen from Gaillardia, also known as
A honey bee dusted with pollen from Gaillardia, also known as "the blanket flower." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee dusted with pollen from Gaillardia, also known as "the blanket flower." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Is that you in there? A honey bee looks up at the photographer as she forages on Gaillardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Is that you in there? A honey bee looks up at the photographer as she forages on Gaillardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Is that you in there? A honey bee looks up at the photographer as she forages on Gaillardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, May 20, 2020 at 5:22 PM

Name That Spider!

This is the female of the new genus, Cryptocteniza. (Image by Jason Bond)

Name that spider!  UC Davis professor Jason Bond is seeking a species name for a new genus of trapdoor spiders he discovered on a sandy beach at Moss Landing State Park, Monterey County. Bond proposes to name the genus, Cryptocteniza,...

This is the female of the new genus, Cryptocteniza. (Image by Jason Bond)
This is the female of the new genus, Cryptocteniza. (Image by Jason Bond)

This is the female of the new genus, Cryptocteniza. (Image by Jason Bond)

This is the male of the new genus, Cryptocteniza.  (Image by Jason Bond)
This is the male of the new genus, Cryptocteniza. (Image by Jason Bond)

This is the male of the new genus, Cryptocteniza. (Image by Jason Bond)

UC Davis professor Jason Bond found the genus on a sandy beach at Moss Landing State Park, Monterey County. (Illustration provided by Jason Bond)
UC Davis professor Jason Bond found the genus on a sandy beach at Moss Landing State Park, Monterey County. (Illustration provided by Jason Bond)

UC Davis professor Jason Bond found the genus on a sandy beach at Moss Landing State Park, Monterey County. (Illustration provided by Jason Bond)

Posted on Tuesday, May 19, 2020 at 4:42 PM

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