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Latest News from the Bug Blog

Hurray for the Red, White and Blue!

Hurray for the red, white and blue! One more day until we celebrate the birth of our country, Independence Day, and the patriotic colors will be out in force. Insects, also, can be red, white and blue. Take the red...


"Red" is for the red flameskimmer, Libellula saturata. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey).

"Red" is for the red flameskimmer, Libellula saturata. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey).


"White" is for the cabbage white butterfly, Pieris rapae. It's a pest, but its colors are appropriate on Independence Day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"White" is for the cabbage white butterfly, Pieris rapae. It's a pest, but its colors are appropriate on Independence Day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)


"Blue" is for Acmon Blue (Plebejus acmon) butterfly. It's as blue as the starry background on the American flag. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"Blue" is for Acmon Blue (Plebejus acmon) butterfly. It's as blue as the starry background on the American flag. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, July 3, 2015 at 4:26 PM

You Can Take That to the Bank!

Sunflower bees, Svastra obliqua expurgata, flying to a nesting area in downtown Davis, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

They're good bees. You can take that to the bank! The excitement began when Martin Guerena, an integrated pest management (IPM) specialist with the City of Davis, encountered a native bee nesting site Wednesday in front of the U.S. Bank, corner of...

Sunflower bees, Svastra obliqua expurgata, flying to a nesting area in downtown Davis, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Sunflower bees, Svastra obliqua expurgata, flying to a nesting area in downtown Davis, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Sunflower bees, Svastra obliqua expurgata, flying to a nesting area in downtown Davis, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A sunflower bee delivering pollen to its nest. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A sunflower bee delivering pollen to its nest. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A sunflower bee delivering pollen to its nest. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A pollen-packing sunflower bee making a deposit near a Davis bank. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A pollen-packing sunflower bee making a deposit near a Davis bank. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A pollen-packing sunflower bee making a deposit near a Davis bank. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Lindsey Hack (left) and  Allie Margulies of the Neal Williams lab, UC Davis, photographing the sunflower bees. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Lindsey Hack (left) and Allie Margulies of the Neal Williams lab, UC Davis, photographing the sunflower bees. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Lindsey Hack (left) and Allie Margulies of the Neal Williams lab, UC Davis, photographing the sunflower bees. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

People make deposits in this bank, but sunflower bees are making deposits near the bank (left, in the wood chip mulch, circled here by yellow caution tape). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
People make deposits in this bank, but sunflower bees are making deposits near the bank (left, in the wood chip mulch, circled here by yellow caution tape). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

People make deposits in this bank, but sunflower bees are making deposits near the bank (left, in the wood chip mulch, circled here by yellow caution tape). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, July 2, 2015 at 6:08 PM

Keep Your 'Girls' Out of California Buckeye

A bee forages on California buckeye in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Beekeepers don't like their "girls" foraging in California buckeye (Aesculus californica) It's poisonous to bees. "The signs of poisoning can be as severe as dying adult bees and brood, only dying brood, brood that barely makes it and emerges...

A bee forages on California buckeye in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A bee forages on California buckeye in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A bee forages on California buckeye in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

California buckeye is poisonous to bees and can result in dying brood, or misshapen brood. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
California buckeye is poisonous to bees and can result in dying brood, or misshapen brood. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

California buckeye is poisonous to bees and can result in dying brood, or misshapen brood. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A California buckeye blooming on the UC Davis campus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A California buckeye blooming on the UC Davis campus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A California buckeye blooming on the UC Davis campus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, July 1, 2015 at 6:02 PM

The Butterfly and the Stink Bug

Papilio rutulus, lands on a butterfly bush. Note the stink bug on top. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's sort of like "The Beauty and the Beast." Or "The Pollinator and the Pest." A gorgeous Western Tiger swallowtail (Papilio rutulus), seeking nectar from a butterfly bush, touched down and began to feed. It didn't take long for the butterfly...

Papilio rutulus, lands on a butterfly bush. Note the stink bug on top. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Papilio rutulus, lands on a butterfly bush. Note the stink bug on top. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Western tiger swallowtail, Papilio rutulus, lands on a butterfly bush. Note the stink bug on top. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Western tiger swallowtail quickly jerks back as it spots the stink bug. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The Western tiger swallowtail quickly jerks back as it spots the stink bug. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Western tiger swallowtail quickly jerks back as it spots the stink bug. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Oops! A sip of a nectar and a view of the stink bug. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Oops! A sip of a nectar and a view of the stink bug. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Oops! A sip of a nectar and a view of the stink bug. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, June 30, 2015 at 6:34 PM

Mighty Mites!

Water mites on a damselfly. (Photo by Greg Kareofelas, taken with a Canon Elph)

If you've ever been "up close and personal" to a damselfly, you might have seen the water mites. Naturalist Greg Karofelas of Davis, an associate of the Bohart Museum of Entomology, has not only seen them, he has photographed them. See his truly...

Water mites on a damselfly. (Photo by Greg Kareofelas, taken with a Canon Elph)
Water mites on a damselfly. (Photo by Greg Kareofelas, taken with a Canon Elph)

Water mites on a damselfly. (Photo by Greg Kareofelas, taken with a Canon Elph)

This image shows a damselfly with water mites on its thorax. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This image shows a damselfly with water mites on its thorax. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This image shows a damselfly with water mites on its thorax. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, June 29, 2015 at 5:36 PM

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