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Posts Tagged: Steve Heydon

A Teaching Moment

Wide-eyed Ethan Fry, 5, and his sister Adi Fry, 7, of Davis, listen to graduate student Charlotte Herbert at the

How do you get your point across if you're trying to explain what a "parasitoid" is? Well, if you're the Bohart Museum of Entomology at the University of California, Davis, you do it with a family craft activity--inflating a balloon inside a...

Wide-eyed Ethan Fry, 5, and his sister Adi Fry, 7, of Davis, listen to graduate student Charlotte Herbert at the
Wide-eyed Ethan Fry, 5, and his sister Adi Fry, 7, of Davis, listen to graduate student Charlotte Herbert at the "parasitoid" balloon station at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Wide-eyed Ethan Fry, 5, and his sister Adi Fry, 7, of Davis, listen to graduate student Charlotte Herbert at the "parasitoid" balloon station at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ethan Fry, 5, of Davis, inflates a balloon at the
Ethan Fry, 5, of Davis, inflates a balloon at the "parasitoid" balloon station. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ethan Fry, 5, of Davis, inflates a balloon at the "parasitoid" balloon station. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, January 12, 2016 at 4:14 PM

Ready for Parasitoid Palooza II? Bohart Museum Open House on Sunday, Jan. 10

A wasp  parasitizing aphids. These wasps are from the family Aphidiinae. (Photo by Fran Keller)

If you've ever tried to rear monarch butterflies, you may have encountered a caterpillar parasitized by a tachinid fly, which oviposits or injects its eggs into it. The fly's life cycle continues, but the host dies.  The tachinid fly is a...

A wasp  parasitizing aphids. These wasps are from the family Aphidiinae. (Photo by Fran Keller)
A wasp parasitizing aphids. These wasps are from the family Aphidiinae. (Photo by Fran Keller)

A wasp parasitizing aphids. These wasps are from the family Aphidiinae. (Photo by Fran Keller)

Posted on Tuesday, January 5, 2016 at 1:48 PM

Oh, What a (Moth) Night!

Moth Night at the Bohart Museum of Entomology was the first-ever evening open house. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Oh, what a (moth) night! Saturday, July 18 marked the beginning of National Moth Week and the Bohart Museum of Entomology obliged with an indoor and outdoor open house, its first-ever evening open house. The event took place from 8 to 11...

Moth Night at the Bohart Museum of Entomology was the first-ever evening open house. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Moth Night at the Bohart Museum of Entomology was the first-ever evening open house. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Moth Night at the Bohart Museum of Entomology was the first-ever evening open house. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Moth Night crowd at the Bohart Museum of Entomology awaiting moths. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The Moth Night crowd at the Bohart Museum of Entomology awaiting moths. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Moth Night crowd at the Bohart Museum of Entomology awaiting moths. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)


"Moth Man" John DeBenedictis of Davis explains the backlighting system to a youngster. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"Moth Man" John DeBenedictis of Davis explains the backlighting system to a youngster. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis entomology student Wade Spencer (center, n black shirt) talks bugs to an enthusiastic crowd. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
UC Davis entomology student Wade Spencer (center, n black shirt) talks bugs to an enthusiastic crowd. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis entomology student Wade Spencer (center, n black shirt) talks bugs to an enthusiastic crowd. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomologist Jeff Smith, a Bohart Museum associate, explains how to spread a moth's wings to Lauren Mitchell, a UC Davis student majoring in ecology, evolution and diversity. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Entomologist Jeff Smith, a Bohart Museum associate, explains how to spread a moth's wings to Lauren Mitchell, a UC Davis student majoring in ecology, evolution and diversity. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomologist Jeff Smith, a Bohart Museum associate, explains how to spread a moth's wings to Lauren Mitchell, a UC Davis student majoring in ecology, evolution and diversity. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Nansen sisters (from left) Emma, 12, Molly, 6, and Miriam, 15, of Davis display entomology buttons. They helped visitors create buttons. Their mother, Maria, is a volunteer at the Bohart, and their father, Christian, is a UC Davis entomologist. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The Nansen sisters (from left) Emma, 12, Molly, 6, and Miriam, 15, of Davis display entomology buttons. They helped visitors create buttons. Their mother, Maria, is a volunteer at the Bohart, and their father, Christian, is a UC Davis entomologist. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Nansen sisters (from left) Emma, 12, Molly, 6, and Miriam, 15, of Davis display entomology buttons. They helped visitors create buttons. Their mother, Maria, is a volunteer at the Bohart, and their father, Christian, is a UC Davis entomologist. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, July 23, 2015 at 6:45 PM

What's It Like to Be Parasitized?

A wasp (family Aphidiinae) parasitizing an aphid. (Photo by Fran Keller, who received her doctorate in entomology this year from UC Davis.)

What's it like to be parasitized? Say you're a caterpillar or an aphid and a wasp comes along and lays her eggs inside you. Her eggs will hatch and then her offspring will eat their way out. You, the host,  are no more. Zero. Zip. Zilch. If...

A wasp (family Aphidiinae) parasitizing an aphid. (Photo by Fran Keller, who received her doctorate in entomology this year from UC Davis.)
A wasp (family Aphidiinae) parasitizing an aphid. (Photo by Fran Keller, who received her doctorate in entomology this year from UC Davis.)

A wasp (family Aphidiinae) parasitizing an aphid. (Photo by Fran Keller, who received her doctorate in entomology this year from UC Davis.)

Posted on Wednesday, January 7, 2015 at 5:10 PM

Let the Bed Bugs Bite

Forceps held by Danielle Wishon zero in on a bed bug to be fed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Most of us remember the old nursery rhyme, "Good night, sleep tight, and don't let the bed bugs bite," and vow to do everything we can to avoid any blood-letting. Whether we call them "blood suckers," "menace in the mattress," or "human...

Forceps held by Danielle Wishon zero in on a bed bug to be fed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Forceps held by Danielle Wishon zero in on a bed bug to be fed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Forceps held by Danielle Wishon zero in on a bed bug to be fed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bed bug scurries away after taking a blood meal. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Bed bug scurries away after taking a blood meal. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bed bug scurries away after taking a blood meal. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Two bed bugs on Danielle Wishon's arm. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Two bed bugs on Danielle Wishon's arm. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Two bed bugs on Danielle Wishon's arm. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Danielle Wishon (foreground at left) answers questions. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Danielle Wishon (foreground at left) answers questions. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Danielle Wishon (foreground at left) answers questions. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, January 13, 2014 at 10:48 PM

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