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Posts Tagged: honey bees

The Year 2017: 'Survival of the Flittest'

Have you ever seen a male long-horned bee (Melissodes agilis) doing a protective fly-by, trying to save a food source for the female of his species? (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

How would you describe the year 2017? Survival of the fittest? In the insect world, it's more like "survival of the flittest." If you've ever pulled up a chair in a pollinator garden and sat back and observed all the activity, sometimes it's like...

Posted on Friday, December 29, 2017 at 11:13 AM

Wonderful News for the CA Master Beekeeper Program!

Elina Lastro Niño (left) tests a prospective graduate of the California Master Beekeeper Program. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Oh, how much this is needed! Congratulations to the California Master Beekeeper Program, the newly announced recipient of a $199,949 grant from the UC Agricultural and Natural Resources through its 2017 Competitive Grants Program.  California...

Posted on Monday, December 11, 2017 at 4:43 PM

Guess How Many Are Coming to Dinner?

Dinner for one? One and done! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Set a plate for one and you might get three more diners. Such was the case recently in a Sonoma garden when a patch Iceland poppy (Papaver nudicaule) drew  a posse of hungry honey bees, all elbowing up to the plate. Iceland poppy is...

Posted on Friday, November 24, 2017 at 2:00 AM

A Bee Is a Bee Is a Bee...

One's a fly and one's a bee. Can you tell them apart? Honey bee on the left: syrphid fly on the right. They're nectaring on Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Remember that line in Gertrude Stein's 1913 poem, Sacred Emily: "A rose is a rose is a rose"? Well, to paraphrase Stein: "A bee is a bee is a bee...except when it's not a bee." In a recent interactive feature in the New York Times, writer Joanna...

Posted on Thursday, November 9, 2017 at 5:00 PM

What Attracts Bees to Blossoms? A Surprising Discovery by UC Davis Ecologist Rachel Vannette

A honey bee heads toward a lupine blossom. It's not just the nectar she's scented. UC Davis community ecologist Rachel Vannette has just published a paper in New Phytologist journal that shows nectar-living microbes release scents or volatile compounds, too, and can influence a pollinator's foraging preference. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

You're watching honey bees foraging in a field.  They buzz toward a blossom, sip nectar, and then head for another blossom. Typical, right? But there's much more going on than you think. It's not just the nectar that she's scented. UC...

Posted on Thursday, September 28, 2017 at 5:00 PM

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