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Posts Tagged: Xerces Society

Status of Overwintering Monarchs in California

Monarch butterfly roosting in Berkeley Aquatic Park in November. They are at the 14th disc golf course in an ash tree. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Is the overwintering monarch butterfly population along California's coast increasing or decreasing? "So far,  far the picture is rather mixed for the number of monarchs in California," according to Matthew Shepherd, communications...

Monarch butterfly roosting in Berkeley Aquatic Park in November. They are at the 14th disc golf course in an ash tree. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Monarch butterfly roosting in Berkeley Aquatic Park in November. They are at the 14th disc golf course in an ash tree. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Monarch butterfly roosting in Berkeley Aquatic Park in November. They are at the 14th disc golf course in an ash tree. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Monarchs nectaring on milkweed in November in Vacaville, Calif. The milkweed is their host plant. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Monarchs nectaring on milkweed in November in Vacaville, Calif. The milkweed is their host plant. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Monarchs nectaring on milkweed in November in Vacaville, Calif. The milkweed is their host plant. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, December 14, 2015 at 7:06 PM

A Wake-Up Call to Conserve California's Monarchs

A monarch butterfly nectaring on a butterfly bush in Vacaville, Calif. today (Oct. 10). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's been called a "wake-up call." And that it is. It's designed to alert people to a problem that needs fixing. And that's good news for the monarch butterflies. California Gov. Jerry Brown has just signed Assembly Bill 559, which gives...

A monarch butterfly nectaring on a butterfly bush in Vacaville, Calif. today (Oct. 10). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A monarch butterfly nectaring on a butterfly bush in Vacaville, Calif. today (Oct. 10). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A monarch butterfly nectaring on a butterfly bush in Vacaville, Calif. today (Oct. 10). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male monarch touches down and rests on a bee condo in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A male monarch touches down and rests on a bee condo in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male monarch touches down and rests on a bee condo in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, October 13, 2015 at 5:19 PM

Go West, Young Monarch, Go West!

A male Monarch nectaring on Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Westward, ho! The western migration of the Monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus)  to their overwintering sites along the California coast is underway. Butterfly expert Art Shapiro, distinguished professor of evolution and ecology at the...

A male Monarch nectaring on Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A male Monarch nectaring on Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male Monarch nectaring on Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Side view of the Monarch. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Side view of the Monarch. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Side view of the Monarch. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Monarch gets ready for flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Monarch gets ready for flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Monarch gets ready for flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, October 14, 2014 at 5:37 PM

Saving the Monarchs

Monarch butterfly nectaring on Mexican sunflower, Tithonia, as a territorial male longhorned bee, Melissodes agilis, takes aim. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation issued news today that is both disturbing and hopeful. Disturbing in that the monarch butterfly population (Danaus plexippus) has declined by more than 90 percent in under 20 years. Hopeful in that...

Monarch butterfly nectaring on Mexican sunflower, Tithonia, as a territorial male longhorned bee, Melissodes agilis, takes aim. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Monarch butterfly nectaring on Mexican sunflower, Tithonia, as a territorial male longhorned bee, Melissodes agilis, takes aim. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Monarch butterfly nectaring on Mexican sunflower, Tithonia, as a territorial male longhorned bee, Melissodes agilis, takes aim. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Monarch butterfly heading toward a butterfly bush. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Monarch butterfly heading toward a butterfly bush. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Monarch butterfly heading toward a butterfly bush. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This is milkweed, the monarch's host plant. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This is milkweed, the monarch's host plant. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This is milkweed, the monarch's host plant. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, August 26, 2014 at 5:48 PM

The Good Guys--and Girls!

A syrphid fly, aka flower fly or hover fly, nectaring on a tower of jewels. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Think of them as "the good guys" and "the good girls." Insects such as lacewings, lady beetles and flower flies. We're delighted to see that the Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation has just published a 250-page book on "Farming with...

A syrphid fly, aka flower fly or hover fly, nectaring on a tower of jewels. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A syrphid fly, aka flower fly or hover fly, nectaring on a tower of jewels. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A syrphid fly, aka flower fly or hover fly, nectaring on a tower of jewels. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A lacewing glows in the afternoon sun. Larvae eat such soft-bodied insects as mealybugs, psyllids, thrips, mites, whiteflies, aphids, small caterpillars, leafhoppers, and insect eggs, according to the UC IPM website. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A lacewing glows in the afternoon sun. Larvae eat such soft-bodied insects as mealybugs, psyllids, thrips, mites, whiteflies, aphids, small caterpillars, leafhoppers, and insect eggs, according to the UC IPM website. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A lacewing glows in the afternoon sun. Larvae eat such soft-bodied insects as mealybugs, psyllids, thrips, mites, whiteflies, aphids, small caterpillars, leafhoppers, and insect eggs, according to the UC IPM website. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The lady beetle, aka ladybug, is well known for its voracious appetite of aphids. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The lady beetle, aka ladybug, is well known for its voracious appetite of aphids. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The lady beetle, aka ladybug, is well known for its voracious appetite of aphids. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, August 11, 2014 at 10:11 PM

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