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Posts Tagged: Neal Williams

Visit from Down Under

Apiarist/pollination specialist Trevor Monson (left) talks bees with pollination ecologist Neal Williams, associate professor, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It was a good visit from "Down Under."  Australian beekeeper/pollination specialist Trevor Monson, a second-generation beekeeper, and his son, Jonathan and nephew Reece spent several hours last week at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee...

Apiarist/pollination specialist Trevor Monson (left) talks bees with pollination ecologist Neal Williams, associate professor, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Apiarist/pollination specialist Trevor Monson (left) talks bees with pollination ecologist Neal Williams, associate professor, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Apiarist/pollination specialist Trevor Monson (left) talks bees with pollination ecologist Neal Williams, associate professor, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Trevor Monson (second from left) and nephew Reece and son Jonathan chat with native pollination specialist Robbin Thorp (far right), distinguished emeritus professor of entomology. They are looking at a Valley carpenter bee nest. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Trevor Monson (second from left) and nephew Reece and son Jonathan chat with native pollination specialist Robbin Thorp (far right), distinguished emeritus professor of entomology. They are looking at a Valley carpenter bee nest. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Trevor Monson (second from left) and nephew Reece and son Jonathan chat with native pollination specialist Robbin Thorp (far right), distinguished emeritus professor of entomology. They are looking at a Valley carpenter bee nest. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Australian trio and two UC Davis scientists are in front of
The Australian trio and two UC Davis scientists are in front of "Miss Bee Haven," the ceramic mosaic sculpture in the UC Davis honey bee garden. From left are Trevor's nephew, Reece; UC Davis native pollinator specialist Robbin Thorp, emeritus professor of entomology at UC Davis; Trevor Monson and his son, Jonathan, and in back, pollination ecologist Neal Williams, associate professor of entomology at UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Australian trio and two UC Davis scientists are in front of "Miss Bee Haven," the ceramic mosaic sculpture in the UC Davis honey bee garden. From left are Trevor's nephew, Reece; UC Davis native pollinator specialist Robbin Thorp, emeritus professor of entomology at UC Davis; Trevor Monson and his son, Jonathan, and in back, pollination ecologist Neal Williams, associate professor of entomology at UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, February 6, 2015 at 6:12 PM

It's Crunch Time: Almond Conference Dec. 9-11

Honey bee pollinating an almond blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's crunch time. Officials organizing the 42nd annual Almond Conference are gearing up for their three-day event, which takes place Tuesday, Dec. 9 through Thursday, Dec. 11 in the Sacramento Convention Center. In a message to the attendees,...

Honey bee pollinating an almond blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Honey bee pollinating an almond blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey bee pollinating an almond blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

An almond orchard in spring of 2013 in Dixon. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
An almond orchard in spring of 2013 in Dixon. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

An almond orchard in spring of 2013 in Dixon. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, December 4, 2014 at 5:50 PM

Why the Squash Bee Is Important

Squash bee, Peponapis pruinosa, on a squash blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Peponapis pruinosa isn't your common household word. But among the people who study pollinators, it is. Also known as a squash bee, it is an important pollinator of cultivated crops of squash, pumpkins, and others members of the...

Squash bee, Peponapis pruinosa, on a squash blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Squash bee, Peponapis pruinosa, on a squash blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Squash bee, Peponapis pruinosa, on a squash blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The squash bee, Peponapis pruinosa, is a specialist, pollinating only the Cucurbita genus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The squash bee, Peponapis pruinosa, is a specialist, pollinating only the Cucurbita genus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The squash bee, Peponapis pruinosa, is a specialist, pollinating only the Cucurbita genus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, June 2, 2014 at 10:09 PM

Here's the Buzz That Might Change How We Think

An Osmia (family Megachilidae) pollinating a flower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Talk about a good insurance policy. Researchers at Michigan State University (MSU) just published an article in the Journal of Applied Ecology that indicates that blueberry growers who invest in nearby wildflower habitat to attract and support wild...

An Osmia (family Megachilidae) pollinating a flower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
An Osmia (family Megachilidae) pollinating a flower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

An Osmia (family Megachilidae) pollinating a flower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The blue orchard bee, Osmia lignaria, is one of the bees that Neal Williams' lab is studying. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The blue orchard bee, Osmia lignaria, is one of the bees that Neal Williams' lab is studying. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The blue orchard bee, Osmia lignaria, is one of the bees that Neal Williams' lab is studying. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of Osmia lignaria  on phacelia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Close-up of Osmia lignaria on phacelia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of Osmia lignaria on phacelia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, April 7, 2014 at 9:59 PM

When Bees Get in Trouble

A queen bee and her colony at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility, UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"Bees are incredibly good at picking up what's in their environment." So said Senior Extension Associate Maryann Frazier of Penn State when she addressed the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology's seminar last Wednesday, April 2 in...

A queen bee and her colony at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility, UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A queen bee and her colony at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility, UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A queen bee and her colony at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility, UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Maryann Frazier with the list of 171 pesticides screened in the U.S. survey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Maryann Frazier with the list of 171 pesticides screened in the U.S. survey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Maryann Frazier with the list of 171 pesticides screened in the U.S. survey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, April 4, 2014 at 8:57 PM

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